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PBS and KQED Partner to Provide Educators With Free Certification in Media Literacy

Last Updated by Susan Timcheck on

Austin, TX – March 5, 2018 – Today at SXSWedu, PBS and KQED, the public media station serving the San Francisco Bay Area, announced a partnership to offer PreK-12 teachers free certification in media literacy. The PBS Media Literacy Educator Certification by KQED recognizes educators who excel in creating and implementing instruction with media, and provides support to help all teachers accelerate these skills.

According to the National Association for Media Literacy Education, a media literate person is defined as one who possesses the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create and act using all forms of communication. By building on the foundations of traditional literacy, media literacy becomes a practical skill that allows educators to contribute to conversations and communities of practice. Developing and honing these skills across several forms of media and communication are especially important for students in the modern classroom.

“Through our work with stations, in communities across the country, we consistently hear from educators that there is a great need for media literacy resources – for them and their students,” said Sara Schapiro, Vice President of PBS Education. “The PBS Media Literacy Educator Certification is designed to celebrate educators who champion teaching and learning with media, and help all educators enhance their skillsets to ensure students have the tools they need to be successful.”

PBS and KQED will offer a pathway to certification through a submission process. Educators who exemplify strong media literacy competencies will be invited to submit a portfolio of work demonstrating their achievements on KQED Teach – KQED’s online professional learning platform. For educators who need support in building the competencies, free media literacy courses will be available on KQED Teach to help teachers improve their skills in specific areas.

“We understand that educators must juggle a number of responsibilities with limited time, so the PBS Media Literacy Educator Certification by KQED was designed to fit into the teacher’s schedule,” said Robin Mencher, Executive Director at KQED Education. “KQED Teach makes it easy for educators to submit their qualifications, or take self-paced online courses to advance their knowledge and use of media in the classroom.”

The KQED media literacy courses will help educators develop competencies including the ability to create original content using multiple media production techniques, share original media on a variety of online platforms designed to reach specific audiences, implement lessons that help students foster media skills and more.

Available courses will include: Finding & Validating Information Online; Understanding Copyright & Fair Use; Video Storytelling Essentials; Designing Presentations; Safety and Privacy in a Participatory Culture; How to Manage and Assess Media Projects; and more.

Teachers who complete the certification program will receive a connection to their local PBS station, a certificate and a digital badge signifying their status as a PBS Media Literacy Educator, the opportunity to participate with and present alongside PBS in a wide variety of events and more.

The PBS Media Literacy Educator Certification by KQED will be available to educators in May 2018. To learn more, visit: kqed.org/certification or stop by the PBS Teacher Lounge at SXSWedu in Austin from March 5-8, 2018.

 

About PBS
PBS, with nearly 350 member stations, offers all Americans the opportunity to explore new ideas and new worlds through television and digital content. Each month, PBS reaches nearly 100 million people through television and nearly 28 million people online, inviting them to experience the worlds of science, history, nature and public affairs; to hear diverse viewpoints; and to take front row seats to world-class drama and performances. PBS’ broad array of programs has been consistently honored by the industry’s most coveted award competitions. Teachers of children from pre-K through 12th grade turn to PBS for digital content and services that help bring classroom lessons to life. Decades of research confirms that PBS’ premier children’s media service, PBS KIDS, helps children build critical literacy, math and social-emotional skills, enabling them to find success in school and life. Delivered through member stations, PBS KIDS offers high-quality educational content on TV – including a new 24/7 channel, online at pbskids.org, via an array of mobile apps and in communities across America. More information about PBS is available at www.pbs.org, one of the leading dot-org websites on the internet, or by following PBS on Twitter, Facebook or through our apps for mobile and connected devices. Specific program information and updates for press are available at pbs.org/pressroom or by following PBS Pressroom on Twitter.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration – exposing them to new people, places and ideas. www.kqed.org

Contacts:
Maria Vera Whelan, PBS; 703.739.3225; mverawhelan@pbs.org
Lindsay Hyman, Allison+Partners; 202.591.1127; pbs@allisonpr.com
Breanna Gilbert, KQED; 408.795.5476; bgilbert@KQED.org